International News Wrap BY JASON MILLER

These are the some of the top international news stories that took place this week:

VATICAN OFFICIAL QUITS OVER FRAUD ALLEGATIONS

Cardinal Angelo Becciu quit his job Thursday, Sept. 24, after he said, he was forced out by Pope Francis after Becciu was accused of fraud. The Vatican released a statement later on the same day confirming Becciu’s resignation had been accepted by the Pope, without giving further details. Becciu, 72, responded at press conference in Rome, saying that he had been pushed out by the Pope. He went on to say that the pontiff summoned him for a long-standing meeting, originally set to discuss possible sainthood candidates, before demanding that Becciu his quit job.

RUSSIA GIVES FLOUR TO NORTH KOREA

Russia has given 25-thousand tons of flour to North Korea to help it overcome COVID-19 and recover from a series of typhoons that hit the region at the end of August and earlier this month.
The Russian Embassy in Pyeongyang says the flour arrived in the North at the port of Nampo and that the Russian crew who helped unload the flour are now under a two-week quarantine.
The embassy said the North has expressed gratitude for the aid. Its agriculture sector has hit badly the aforementioned typhoons.
This was the second time Russia has sent flour this year, the Russian government provided the earlier supply to North Korean women and children in May.

JAPANESE GOVERNMENT ASKS MEDIA TO REVERSE FIRST AND LAST NAMES

Foreign journalists working in Japan say they are coming under pressure from the Japanese government to give in to the their request to reverse the order of individuals’ names when they do their reporting in digital and print media. In September 2019 then-prime minister Shinzo Abe, announced his government would standardize the writing of Japanese names when they appear in Latin script on official documents, and said domestic media should do the same. National broadcaster NHK was the first to do so, but other media companies including foreign companies have been slow to adapt.

NEW MIXED GENDER K-POP GROUP DEBUTS FOR FIRST TIME IN 20 YEARS

New co-ed K-pop group CHECKMATE made its debut on Tuesday, Sept. 21. From left are Nason, Sieun, Yongseok, Suri and Noah. Photo Courtesy of GRACE COMPANY Entertainment

Not seen since the 90’s and early 2000’s a mixed gender K-Pop group made it’s international debut on Tuesday, Sept. 21. The groups name is “Checkmate,” and comprises of two females (Sieun, Suri) and three males (Yongseok, Nason, Noah). The group dropped its first album “DRUM” on Sept. 21, its agency GRACE COMPANY Entertainment said earlier in a statement this week. “Acclaimed producers in and out of Korea have worked on the debut track,” and “The members have already caught the attention of fans in Europe and South America (through social media),” said the company. Co-ed pop groups like Koyote (KYT) and Cool basked in popularity 20 years, but are hardly seen these days. Single-gender bands are more common because they are easier to manage and better for marketing, according to industry insiders.


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